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Do YOU consider kissing someone else cheating? Shocking research reveals men believe passionately smooching another woman does NOT count as infidelity

Do YOU consider kissing someone else cheating? Shocking research reveals men believe passionately smooching another woman does NOT count as infidelity

Relationship breakdowns are rife and divorce rates are on the rise – but could your ‘faithful’ husband be engaging in infidelity without realising it? A new study has revealed that a staggering 19 per cent of men believe ‘passionately kissing’ someone other than their partner is acceptable.

Just nine per cent of women, meanwhile, think that kissing another person would not be a relationship-breaking issue for their partners.

Ironically the study of 5,000 people, conducted by charities Relate and Relationships Scotland , also found that two thirds of all couples felt they could not survive their partner cheating on them.

The charities’ researchers said their findings were proof that Britain needs both better sex education in schools, and easier access to relationship counselling for adults.

A considerably one third of people surveyed said they had been cheated on, while another nine per cent admitted they were suspicious their partner could have been unfaithful.

The Way We Are Now study found that communication breakdown, especially when it comes to talking about sex lives, could explain this disparity among opinions.

Older and younger generations are also split on what they consider to be cheating.

Although the charities concluded that defining ‘cheating’ has become more difficult in today’s digital age, contrary to their ‘Tinder generation reputation’, young people aged 16 to 24 are the most possessive.

CHEATING: THE STATS

-45 per cent of young lovers said they considered their partners even flirting with someone else to be cheating

-31 per cent over all age groups said they would split up with a flirty partner

-Twice as many women as men said they thought their partner watching porn alone meant they were being unfaithful

-93 per cent of experts believe relationships can survive an affair by either partner

A strong 45 per cent of young lovers said  they considered their partners even flirting with someone else to be cheating.

Conversely their older peers are more content to put up with a wandering eye, with just 31 per cent over all age groups saying they would split up with a flirty partner.

Pornography also divided the age groups.

Women were generally more conservative, with twice as many (20 per cent to 11 per cent) saying they thought their partner watching porn alone meant they were being unfaithful.

But whatever the varied opinions on what constitutes breaking the implicit trust of being in a relationship, counsellors and sex therapists have a very different view to most people on how to deal with cheating.

A huge 93 per cent of experts believe relationships can survive an affair by either partner.

Relate counsellor Barbara Honey said in the study: ‘When you can help people to grieve what they feel they have lost and then re-gain trust and make sense of what has happened, they have a good chance of having a stronger relationship than they had before the affair.

‘Counselling is very helpful because it ‘gives permission’ for the processes that need to happen before the pain can reduce and the relationship be restored.

‘Often people who have had an affair want to brush it under the carpet and move on, not realising that grieving for the betrayed partner has to happen first.’